Horse Racing Art Somerset

Horse Racing Art Somerset
Horse Racing Art Somerset

Are you a fan of horse racing? If so, you will love the horse racing art Somerset-based artist Caroline Cook creates. She produces a wide variety of animal art, bus specialises in the best horse racing art Somerset has to offer. The work that Caroline produces captures the excitement of the race as well as the elegance and beauty of the horses and their close relationship with the jockey.
There is something about horse racing that captures the imagination of many people. This is probably with horse racing art is so popular with customers from Somerset and elsewhere. This is not a new phenomenon. Horse racing has been popular for thousands of years. For example, there is evidence of horse racing and chariot racing in the Olympic Games in Greece in the eight century BCE – that is over 2,700 years ago. How do we know that horse racing was so popular in ancient history? Because of evidence that survives, including written accounts but also horse racing art. The horse racing art that survives tends to be in the form of vases and carvings, but nonetheless it shows that the horse racing art Somerset collectors love is connected to a deeper love of equestrian sports that has been part of human cultures for many years.
After the Ancient Greeks, other cultures had a love for horse racing. The exact timescale on which it it developed is unclear, but it is evident that at some point, a tradition of horse racing developed in China, Persia, North Africa, the Middle East and Italy. For example, the nations in the Middle East and North Africa became renowned for their horses. They may not have left vast quantities of horse racing art so that enthusiasts in Somerset can find out details about this fascinating history of equestrian sports, but they still contributed to the modern sport of horse racing. How so?
In the 11th to 13th centuries, many Europeans travelled to the Middle East as part of the Crusades. This was a bloody period in world history, with many tragic events. One unexpected outcome, however, was that Europeans brought back Arabian, Barb and Turk horses to Europe. Recognising the strength and speed of these animals, knights and landowners were quick to invest in these animals, using them to strengthen the bloodlines of European horses. These horses were used in races. For example, Richard the Lionheart, King of England in the late 12th century, offered the first recorded racing purse in Britain, a prize of £40 for a 3 mile race with his knights as the jockeys. Later on, Henry VIII imported horses from Italy and Spain to expand his own racing stables. A later king of England, Charles I, had 139 horses when he was executed in 1649.
If you are looking for the best horse racing art Somerset has to offer, you are following a long and honourable tradition of equestrian sports, something that has worldwide popularity. For more enquiries about commissions, original work and the best range of horse racing art Somerset has to offer, contact Caroline today